Thursday 3 August 2017
Craig Cove, Ambrym

Our team seem to be finding the six am generator firing up a little tiresome. Once  again our day started at six with the generator starting. Breakfast then the five that slept ashore were picked up at seven.

The anchor was raised from our comfy anchorage here at Paama and we were motoring across the bottom of Ambrym Island with a very gentle breeze behind us. We were delivered fair winds and smooth seas, thank you. 

 
Very pleasant with a beautiful view of the volcanoes and the most unusual terrain, sort of like cruising alongside a national park in Australia. Even Morinda, our mission coordinator who normally very much dislikes the sailing, seemed to be enjoying this trip.

Once again we started Chimere’s desalination plant while we were crossing the beautiful clean water, we had emptied two tanks since last running the water maker. It is such a wonderful thing to be able to do, particularly when 10 or more people are using water for washing clothes and showering. To be able to replace it in two or three hours is very nice.

After much deliberation we dropped anchor in 11 metres of water on the southern side of Craigs Cove. After doing a run around in the dinghy (to check for coral heads) we were confident we were safe and the anchor was holding firm. 

 
Once again the Ni-vans were dropped ashore to find out where we could hold a clinic, a suitable place was found near where we could get the dinghy landed.  All equipment was taken ashore and readied for the clinic in the morning. A number of the medical people have to be at the airport at midday so the clinic will be short.

All on board have been busy writing about the mission tonight, so no playing cards as there has been the last couple of nights. 

 
We are quite sad that tonight is the last night aboard for some. The crew and the medical team have got along so well, amazing really when we all come from such diverse back grounds. They have all been very patient and caring to the captain (me) and each other.

Fair winds, smooth seas and the six am generator

Phil Wicks